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Monthly Archives: July 2018

POPULAR NOT POPULIST: GOV BAKER CONTINUES TO POLL WELL WITH PEOPLE HE’S SCREWING

 

July 31, 2018

BY JASON PRAMAS @JASONPRAMAS

 

There is no area of Massachusetts politics where it is more baffling to contemplate Gov. Charlie Baker’s ongoing popularity in the polls than the annual state budget debate. One can only draw two conclusions from such musing: either people don’t get the budget information they need from Bay State press, or a majority of Commonwealth residents simply enjoy watching poor people get kicked to the curb. While corporations are encouraged to line their pockets with public funds in ways that hurt everyone but the wealthy.

 

At no time of year is the contradiction of Baker’s popularity thrown into bold relief more than late July when he issues his line item vetoes and other modifications to the legislature’s final budget.

 

And this year that contradiction is sharper than ever. Because the most visible victims of the governor’s last budget action look to be people on welfare—many of whom are single mothers with children.

 

So last week, Baker refused to agree to a budget policy section that would remove the “family cap” that stops families on welfare from being able to receive extra benefits for children born while they were on welfare. Instead he sent an amended version of the family cap section of the state budget back to the legislature.

 

As reported by MassLive, “That amendment would lift the family cap but also change welfare eligibility laws so that an adult’s Supplemental Security Income is counted when determining if a family is eligible for welfare. SSI is a federal payment given to severely disabled adults.” … “According to state figures as of last year, 5,200 children with a severely disabled parent would lose their welfare benefits entirely under the change, and 2,100 children would lose part of their benefit.”

 

By contrast, MassLive continues, “Lifting the family cap would make approximately 8,700 additional children eligible for welfare assistance.”

 

If the family cap policy section of the budget had simply been vetoed, it could have been overridden by a two-thirds vote of the legislature like any other veto. But since its language was amended and sent back to the legislature for action, they have to vote on it like a new bill. After which, Baker has 10 days to act on it. And since he sent it back to the legislature at the end of its current session, the end of the 10 days after any new bill passes comes after the session is over. So Baker can simply veto it, and supporters will have to wait until next session to go through the entire legislative process again.

 

Advocates from organizations like Mass Law Reform Institute and Greater Boston Legal Services are crying foul, given the heartlessness of the measure and the fact that it has taken years to get the family cap reform through the legislature.

 

As of this writing, the House has reinstated the original family cap language, and the Senate is expected to do the same. But Baker will almost certainly veto it within 10 days of passage as planned. After the legislative session has ended.

 

Which is a total drag, and exemplary of a backwards view of welfare as an “incentive” to “encourage” poor people to work. Language that Baker has used when explaining his position on the family cap debate—a standard conservative view, unfortunately shared by Republicans and many Democrats alike, that poor people are poor because of individual failings like “laziness,” not for any structural reasons beyond their immediate control.

 

But here’s another way to view welfare: People are poor because just as capitalism provides billions of dollars to a vanishingly small number of big winners like Jeff Bezos and the Koch brothers, it creates millions of losers who have to struggle endlessly to make ends meet. Meaning inequality is baked into our economic system. Without strong government regulation, capitalism is incapable of even blunting the brutal impact of such inherent flaws, let alone somehow fixing those flaws.

 

Part of that inequality comes in the form of job provision. Since the drive for people at the commanding heights of the capitalist system is always to maximize profits, their concomitant drive is to do so by slashing labor costs whenever possible. One way they have done this since the 1970s is by changing labor from a fixed cost—as it tended to be under postwar American social democracy when over 30 percent of the workforce was protected by government-backed union contracts and there was a reasonable social safety net (including welfare)—to a variable cost.

 

The result? As was last the case at the turn of the 20th century while a militant labor movement spent decades fighting the “robber baron” billionaires of that era for redress, bosses can hire workers when needed at the worst possible rates and push them out when they don’t need them. Often without even having to officially fire workers—which would allow them to collect unemployment for a few months. And the largely ununionized workforce has almost no say about the conditions of its employment, or job policies in general, outside of insufficient minimum wage laws, easily avoided health and safety laws, and a few increasingly weak civil rights laws that might get a handful of people reinstated on the same bad terms on the rare occasions when open discriminatory practices by employers can be proven.

 

So by converting stable decent-paying union jobs to unstable contingent jobs—like temp, part-time, contract, day labor, and independent contractor jobs—over the last 40 years, capitalism and the capitalists who run it have ensured the creation of a growing impoverished underclass. This vast group of poor people acts as a reserve army of labor that, together with vicious union-busting that is on the verge of killing the American labor movement, accelerates the downward pressure on wages. And ensures that the only jobs that most poor people can get are bad contingent jobs.

 

When poor people can’t put together enough of these precarious non-jobs to make ends meet, they turn to welfare. But the old “outdoor relief” programs that provided poor men with jobs, money, food, and other necessities in many parts of the country were eliminated long ago (as were New Deal-era public jobs programs), and the remaining welfare system that largely benefitted poor women and children was hamstrung by the Democratic Clinton administration in 1996. Not coincidentally, its prescriptions were first tested here in Massachusetts in 1995 by our completely Democrat-dominated legislature—presided over by a Republican governor, Bill Weld. A so-called “libertarian” cut from much the same cloth as Charlie Baker.

 

According to a 2008 report (“Following Through on Welfare Reform”) by the Mass Budget and Policy Center, the one-two state-federal punch to poor women and children in the Commonwealth predictably ended up significantly cutting already meager welfare payments by imposing time limits on assistance and by mandating the most cruelly ironic possible change, “work requirements.”

 

Why cruelly ironic? Because the work requirements forced people who were poor because the only jobs available to them were bad contingent jobs to prove they were “working” before getting the reduced welfare benefits still on offer.

 

The new system was in many cases literally run by the very temp agencies that played a key role in making people poor to begin with. The “jobs” forced on people to qualify for much-denuded benefits were often not jobs at all. Welfare applicants were just “employed” by such temp agencies—now recast as privatized social service agencies—and forced to wait for “assignments” that were low-paying and sporadic. But unless they “worked” a certain amount under this system, no benefits. It was a hardline right-winger’s wet dream made flesh. The same capitalist system that made them poor now kept them poor. And state and federal government were no longer in the “business” of helping offset the worst depredations of capitalist inequality in what we still like to call a democracy.

 

So this is what popular Gov. Charlie Baker is up to when he plays games with reforms like the family cap. He’s screwing people who get a few hundred bucks a month in benefits out of an extra hundred a month for another kid born while they’re jumping through every conceivable time-wasting bureaucratic hoop and working the same shit jobs that made them poor to begin with. Meanwhile, he’s finding new and creative ways to dump more millions in public treasure on the undeserving rich with each passing year.

 

And you like this guy, fellow Massholes?! Just remember, in a “race to the bottom” economy presided over by capitalist hatchet men like Baker, once the poor are completely crushed, the working class is next. Followed by the middle class. Maybe think that over next time a pollster asks your opinion of the man.

 

Apparent Horizon—winner of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia’s 2018 Best Political Column award—is syndicated by the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism. Jason Pramas is BINJ’s network director, and executive editor and associate publisher of DigBoston. Copyright 2018 Jason Pramas. Licensed for use by the Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism and media outlets in its network.

wow! thanks so much to @fara1 and my more quiet @digboston partners for making this award possible! congratulations to @DigBoston colleagues @saucylit and @KuresseBoldsArt for their awards! and thanks to the @AltWeeklies judges for calling out our work for special favor! https://twitter.com/Fara1/status/1023340237651668997 …

wow! thanks so much to and my more quiet partners for making this award possible! congratulations to colleagues and for their awards! and thanks to the judges for calling out our work for special favor! https://twitter.com/Fara1/status/1023340237651668997 …


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
wow! thanks so much to @fara1 and my more quiet @digboston partners for making this award possible! congratulations to @DigBoston colleagues @saucylit and @KuresseBoldsArt for their awards! and thanks to the @AltWeeklies judges for calling out our work for special favor! https://twitter.com/Fara1/status/1023340237651668997 …

The Sherwood syndrome. We picture ancient Britain as a land of enchanted forests. That’s a fantasy: axes have been ringing for a very long time. https://aeon.co/essays/who-chopped-down-britain-s-ancient-forests … #Archaeology #history #ecology #takethathippies

The Sherwood syndrome. We picture ancient Britain as a land of enchanted forests. That’s a fantasy: axes have been ringing for a very long time.
https://aeon.co/essays/who-chopped-down-britain-s-ancient-forests …


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
The Sherwood syndrome. We picture ancient Britain as a land of enchanted forests. That’s a fantasy: axes have been ringing for a very long time.
https://aeon.co/essays/who-chopped-down-britain-s-ancient-forests … #Archaeology #history #ecology #takethathippies

FLIPPING US THE BIRD: Scooter-sharing company litters Camberville with dangerous vehicles no one asked for. The latest from @jasonpramas. https://digboston.com/flipping-us-the-bird-scooter-sharing-company-litters-camberville-with-dangerous-vehicles-no-one-asked-for/ … #mapoli #bospoli #politics #transportation #health #safety #jerktechpic.twitter.com/lwj56wV7k7

FLIPPING US THE BIRD: Scooter-sharing company litters Camberville with dangerous vehicles no one asked for. The latest from . https://digboston.com/flipping-us-the-bird-scooter-sharing-company-litters-camberville-with-dangerous-vehicles-no-one-asked-for/ …


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
FLIPPING US THE BIRD: Scooter-sharing company litters Camberville with dangerous vehicles no one asked for. The latest from @jasonpramas. https://digboston.com/flipping-us-the-bird-scooter-sharing-company-litters-camberville-with-dangerous-vehicles-no-one-asked-for/ … #mapoli #bospoli #politics #transportation #health #safety #jerktechpic.twitter.com/lwj56wV7k7

sneak peek at my latest column… https://digboston.com/flipping-us-the-bird-scooter-sharing-company-litters-camberville-with-dangerous-vehicles-no-one-asked-for/ … #transportation #politics

sneak peek at my latest column… https://digboston.com/flipping-us-the-bird-scooter-sharing-company-litters-camberville-with-dangerous-vehicles-no-one-asked-for/ …


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
sneak peek at my latest column… https://digboston.com/flipping-us-the-bird-scooter-sharing-company-litters-camberville-with-dangerous-vehicles-no-one-asked-for/ … #transportation #politics

FLIPPING US THE BIRD: SCOOTER-SHARING COMPANY LITTERS CAMBERVILLE WITH DANGEROUS VEHICLES NO ONE ASKED FOR

Bird’s model looks to be entirely profit-driven and completely mean-spirited. No matter how much CEO Travis VanderZanden tries to equate the unasked-for and unwanted service to “freedom.”

Why I walked off a Birthright trip. #Jewish students leave free #Israel tour citing “political propaganda.”: “We needed to see the reality of the occupation and hear a #Palestinian perspective…” https://buff.ly/2mF2ohw  #mapoli #Boston #BDS #student #protestpic.twitter.com/USDjd0NzQP

Why I walked off a Birthright trip. students leave free tour citing “political propaganda.”: “We needed to see the reality of the occupation and hear a perspective…” https://buff.ly/2mF2ohw 


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
Why I walked off a Birthright trip. #Jewish students leave free #Israel tour citing “political propaganda.”: “We needed to see the reality of the occupation and hear a #Palestinian perspective…” https://buff.ly/2mF2ohw  #mapoli #Boston #BDS #student #protestpic.twitter.com/USDjd0NzQP

14,000-Year-Old Piece Of #Bread Rewrites The #History Of #Baking And #Farming – NPR #science #food https://apple.news/A08lzpN18TL6RBfqoA04N0A …

14,000-Year-Old Piece Of Rewrites The Of And – NPR https://apple.news/A08lzpN18TL6RBfqoA04N0A …


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
14,000-Year-Old Piece Of #Bread Rewrites The #History Of #Baking And #Farming – NPR #science #food https://apple.news/A08lzpN18TL6RBfqoA04N0A …

Why suspect faces murder charge although police bullet killed Trader Joe's employee #geethatsatoughone https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/us/trader-joes-suspect-murder-charge/ …

Why suspect faces murder charge although police bullet killed Trader Joe’s employee https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/us/trader-joes-suspect-murder-charge/ …


Source: @jasonpramas Twitter account feed
Why suspect faces murder charge although police bullet killed Trader Joe’s employee #geethatsatoughone https://www.cnn.com/2018/07/25/us/trader-joes-suspect-murder-charge/ …